Dong Kingman – Street Artist

An interesting short film from the 1950’s – following along in the creation of a single watercolor painting from the busy streets of Chinatown, New York to the reflective quiet space of the artist’s studio.

 

 

Dong Kingman (Chinese: 曾景文, 31 March 1911 – 12 May 2000) was a Chinese American artist and one of America’s leading watercolor masters. As a painter on the forefront of the California Style School of painting, he was known for his urban and landscape paintings, as well as his graphic design work in the Hollywood film industry. He has won widespread critical acclaim and his works are included in over 50 public and private collections worldwide, including Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Brooklyn Museum; deYoung Museum and Art Institute, Chicago. -Wikipedia

Further Observation

571ecb008935b23f6d64e27f237d7101.jpg

 

 

Critique: A Student’s Perspective

 

As an illustration professor, I teach only “critique” classes. That means, my students and I face a wall of artwork and talk about it exhaustively, for the full 2 1/2- to 5-hour class. For my students and me, a successful class is uphill all the way: overcoming obstacles such as boredom, frustration, ignorance, fatigue, laziness, craziness and incompetence (both of students and faculty). Luckily, I have terrific students who provide a large dose of inspiration, energy and smarts. Otherwise, the entire process would be torturous. 

This video is by RISD graphic design senior Karen Kavett (who was never a student of mine), and was passed along by RISD’s President John Maeda. It’s so accurate, it’s scary… and funny.

Welcome to my world.